Università degli Studi di Ferrara Politecnico Milano 1863 University of Milano-Bicocca

Vendor Seminars

Mon June 17
12.20 - 13.20

Hall U6 - 07
ground floor

Maximum Resolution for the separation of Biomolecules

Speakers: B. Peters (Merck, Germany), C. Muraco (Millipore Sigma, USA), P. Lewits (Merck, Germany)

The high resolution HPLC separation of biomolecules is of increasing importance, especially in the pharmaceutical industry, where the market dramatically changed from small molecules to protein-based drugs and antibodies.
Biomolecules are chemically and structurally diverse and include proteins, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleic acids. Due to the inherent structural complexity and broad chemical composition of these biomolecules, multiple separation modes, column chemistries and detection techniques are required for full characterization. In addition, the need to consider biological activity of the therapeutic as well as strategies to minimize sample matrix effects are equally important for analytical scientists.
Finally, due to the broad range of molecular weights of analytes in biomolecule separations, the pore size of the stationary phase has a high influence on the separation performance. Large molecules typically require particles with larger pores in order to minimize size-exclusion effects and/or to allow the larger analyte to completely interact with the stationary phase surface.
To completely characterize biomolecules, different modes of chromatography are employed. Merck offers a complete portfolio of stationary phases for reversed phase, size exclusion, affinity, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and ion-exchange chromatography.
In this seminar, different, outstanding column technologies will be showcased in more detail enabling superior separations for different needs. Application examples employing biomolecules will be used to illustrate the unique advantages these column technologies have over "conventional" U/HPLC columns. In addition, method development strategies used to better characterize biomolecules using these columns will be shared.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Mon June 17
12.20 - 13.20

Hall U6 - 09
ground floor

Practical Applications of InfinityLab 2D-LC Solutions

Speakers: M. Lämmerhofer (University of Tübingen, Germany), J. Meixner (Agilent Technologies, Germany)

Two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) can be seen as the next logical step in liquid chromatography. It is considered the technique of choice when chromatographic resolution is insufficient, when samples are complex or of higher dimensionality (e.g. polymers), or to streamline a labor-intensive workflow.
In particular, 2D-LC can be very valuable to overcome challenges when analyzing pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical products. In this context the different 2D modes like multiple heart-cut as well as selective and full comprehensive LCxLC are applied to achieve results in the fields of peptide and vitamin analysis as well as for the impurity and enantioselective analysis. Workflows and results of these applications will be highlighted in this seminar.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Mon June 17
12.20 - 13.20

Hall U6 - 01F
ground floor

New Tools for Your Challenging Separations: User-friendly nanoLC columns and a high success rate chiral LC column

Speakers: J.A. Anspach (Phenomenex, USA), B. Chandvetadze (Tbilisi State University, Georgia), T. Farkas (Phenomenex, USA), G. Friedlander (Phenomenex, USA), J. Hseu (Phenomenex, USA), L. Loo (Phenomenex, USA), C. Sanchez (Phenomenex, USA), R. van Soest (Sciex, USA)

Reoptimize Chiral Screening Protocols to Include Amylose tris (3-chloro-5-methylphenylcarbamate) as Chiral Selector of Exceptional Recognition Ability
The separation and quantitation of the enantiomers of chiral molecules is predominantly achieved by HPLC, primarily with columns made with polysaccharide based chiral selectors. The first step in chiral HPLC method development consists of screening various columns in combination with specific mobile phase conditions in the hope of achieving chiral recognition. This step is followed by method optimization meant to improve the separation of enantiomers to achieve adequate method performance.
Current screening protocols include a select group of chiral columns of high and complementary recognition ability. These columns are ranked and grouped based on this ability resulting in a particular order of utility. The first tier of columns includes the one known to provide the highest separation success along with other that have been shown to provide the highest number complementary separations.
This presentation proposes a revised, more effective screening protocol that includes an amylose tris (3-chloro-5-methylphenylcarbamate) - based column shown here to demonstrate the highest success rate in all common separation modes. Given its exceptional recognition ability, this column allows for a new ranking and grouping of the chiral HPLC columns routinely screened for the separation of chiral species at large. Column complementarity needs to be reconsidered when adopting an amylose tris (3-chloro-5-methylphenylcarbamate) - based column as the one providing the highest success rate. This leads to a different, more effective order of utility.

Improving MS Sensitivity with Easy to Use Nano LC Columns
There have been very significant advances in MS sensitivity in recent years. So much so that many MS manufactures claim that if the ion gets into the MS, it will get detected. There is however, always the need for greater sensitivity. To achieve this with modern MS systems, we need to turn to the efficiency of ionization and getting ions into the MS. One way to improve ionization efficiency is to go to lower LC flow rates when using LC/MS. By going to lower flow rates, you can increase the charge density of ionization and have less solvent molecules competing for charge. The lower flow rates also allow one to spray directly into the MS orifice. Going to lower flow rates, however, requires going to much smaller I.D. columns. When going to nano flow columns (columns I.D. <100 µm) the HPLC equipment and especially connections become very challenging to reproducibly use on a routine basis. In this talk we will show a new generation of Nano flow columns with easy to use connections for improved reproducibility. We will also show how when coupled to a new adjustment free electrospray source, you can increase up time and improve reproducibility in your nano LC/MS separations.

Sponsored by

 

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Mon June 17
12.20 - 13.20

Hall U6 - 01A
ground floor

Chemical Innovations to Facilitate the LC Analysis of Biopharmaceuticals

Speaker: M.A. Lauber (Waters Corporation, USA)

The analytical approaches for assaying biopharmaceuticals have been forever changed by the availability and utility of liquid chromatography (LC). Because of their effectiveness in profiling active ingredients, degradants and product related variants, LC separations now represent some of the most well established techniques for analyzing both small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. Facilitating this adoption rate has been the continuous improvement in LC based techniques, wherein insights about particle construction, surface chemistry, mobile phase systems, and sample preparation approaches have led to numerous compelling innovations.
In the pursuit of higher and higher efficiency, stationary phase particles have been miniaturized and solid core morphologies have been adopted. Shorter analysis times can now be achieved without sacrificing resolution. Carefully optimized surface chemistries have also made it possible to minimize undesirable secondary interactions as well as to reduce the dependence of a separation on mobile phase additives. Moreover, novel mobile phase systems and sample vessels have been developed to improve the quality, sensitivity and robustness of particular assays.
We will describe a number of these innovations that have been or will be of impact to LC analysts. A number of topics will be presented, ranging from the development of particles and surface chemistries for protein RPLC and IEX to a novel ion pairing agent for improved LC-MS and sample containers with improved inertness for higher recovery sample preparations.


Tue June 18
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 07
ground floor

Welcome to the future

Speakers: G.J. Schad (Shimadzu Europa GmbH, Germany), C.J. Welch (Welch Innovation, LLC, USA)

Shimadzu has long been advancing the analytical performance of HPLC systems. However, we recognize that overall efficiency depends not only on the performance of one instrument, but on the management of all devices within a lab. We will be introducing the new Nexera series of (U)HPLC systems that merges Analytical Intelligence and IoT (internet of things) enhancements to set new industry standards in terms of intelligence, efficiency and design. In a second presentation the successful collaboration with industry partners in the "Enabling Technologies Consortium" is introduced, which lead to development of the next generation semi-preparative SFC system. It was built to fulfill current customer requirements. Superior sample recovery, reliability and ease-of-use in a small footprint are just a few of the system features.


Tue June 18
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01B
ground floor

More LC Productivity: Get Primed for LC/MS and Learn about "Self-driving" Mass Detection

Speakers: J. Byrd (Agilent Technologies, Germany), M. Ostrowski (Agilent Technologies, Germany)

Get Primed for LC/MS!
Recent advances in Liquid Chromatography hardware, software, consumables and accessories have enabled LC and LC/MS experiments to be more sensitive and accurate while increasing the convenience and comfort for the users of this technology. The 1260 Infinity II Prime LC System, the latest addition to the InfinityLab family of LC products, has state-of-the-art features that enable fast and reliable results and is designed to be a joy to use. Please join us to learn about the technology and the unique benefits that they bring to any LC or LC/MS experiment.

Learn about "Self-Driving" Mass Detection Designed for Everyone
Technology becomes more intelligent, self-diagnosing, and simpler to use daily. For example, while self-driving cars are not yet publicly available, vehicle manufacturers increasingly integrate automated assistance with the goal of providing drivers greater efficiency and new access to transportation.
Similarly, mass spectrometry, an enabling technology across many scientific fields, continues to advance in instrument design, size, diagnostics and artificial intelligence, enabling greater access to MS for the non-expert. We will describe new "self-driving" capabilities of MS in data acquisition, analysis, diagnostics, and open-access software that allow LC users to quickly obtain better insights with minimal experience and training with single quad MS.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Tue June 18
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01F
ground floor

Automated UHPLC method modeling: A step towards innovative chromatographic data generation and analysis

Speakers: I. Molnár (Molnár-Institute for Applied Chromatography, Germany), A. Zöldhegyi (Molnár-Institute for Applied Chromatography, Germany)

Automated routines in chromatographic modeling are powerful tools to mitigate human error, increase productivity and reduce costs per analysis. The demonstrated study showcases successful automated method development workflow on industrial Cannabis sativa sample – including the separation modeling of 4 main peaks of interest (CBD, CDBA, THC and THCA) and 10 additional compounds. Automation steps include seamless integration of DryLab software to Waters Empower chromatographic data system at three different levels:

  • batch creation and acquisition of 12 input experiments required for a 3D Design Space
  • model-, and setpoint verifications
  • experimental confirmation of model robustness results, based on different scientific approaches

Furthermore, as a part of scientific UHPLC model flexibility, new powerful 3D-perspectives on design space were demonstrated and tested. By visualizing interdependences of flowrate (F) and gradient properties (start-, and end%[B]) extended gradient time-temperature models (tG-T-F / tG-T-start[%B] / tG-T-end[%B]) can be yielded – practical for easy-definition of robust methods and transparent regulatory filings.

Finally we will report about the introduction of a new general chromatography data format, called *.dlproj. This format includes up to 12 input chromatograms, column and instrument conditions, peak tracking, robustness calculations, and all of this summarized in a QbD-relevant Knowledge Management Document for industrial, academic and regulatory communications on issues of product quality and life cycle management in UHPLC.

Sponsored by

 

Tue June 18
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01A
ground floor

Revolutionising Chromatography with the Vanquish UHPLC systems

Speakers: P. Carsten (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Germany), G. Köllensperger (University of Wien, Austria)

The Vanquish UHPLC platform was introduced five year ago in 2014 and revolutionised UHPLC through innovative design to deliver the requirements demanded by the modern chromatographer. During this seminar, we shall demonstrate how the Vanquish platform has delivered these features in to tangible user benefits and how the revolution in liquid separations through Vanquish has progressed over the past five year, cumulating in the recent Vanquish Duo systems.
The latest addition to the Vanquish platform is the Vanquish Duo which allows three workflows (Dual LC, Tandem LC or LC-MS and Inverse Gradient) and two independent flow paths in one complete system solution. The seminar will outline the advances that made this possible, the workflows and the advantages these produce. The seminar concludes with Professor Gunda Koellensperger describing how they have utilised the Dual LC workflow of the Vanquish Duo to merge metabolomics and lipidomics into a single analytical run to improve throughput and subsequently productivity.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Wed June 19
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 06
ground floor

Analytical Quality by Design and Method Lifecycle Management: Past, Present and Future

Speaker: L. Sousa (Hovione, Portugal)

The importance of applying method lifecycle management (MLCM) concepts to pharmaceutical analytical methods has been recently recognized. This includes the application of Analytical Quality by Design (AQbD) principles during analytical method development. The aim of this presentation is to explain the evolution of both concepts and evaluate the advantages of their adoption and application.
The roadmap of the regulatory and industry events that mark the evolution of these concepts helps to capture the current and future expectation of the pharmaceutical framework.


Wed June 19
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01F
ground floor

Scaling up for your future with the new Agilent InfinityLab Purification Solutions

Speakers: F. Rieck (Agilent Technologies, Germany), I. Spuling (Agilent Technologies, Germany)

Whether you have just started a small synthetic lab and need to purify your first drug candidate or entered a new stage in drug development and need to scale up to gram quantities, you will choose from a portfolio of state-of-the-art LC purification instruments that offers you scalable solutions to grow with your needs. Increase your daily sample turnover by software-aided, automated scale-up from analytical to preparative mass-based purification. Boost your fraction re-analysis workflow by integrated re-injection sequences. Set up a service lab to support a group of synthetic chemists with first class purification and analytical services. Learn how the Agilent InfinityLab Purification Solutions can improve the efficiency of your purification workflow.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Wed June 19
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01A
ground floor

Increasing Method Throughput with Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

Speakers: J. Grinias (Rowan University, USA), W. Shatz (Genentech Research and Development Group, USA)

Whether your lab is examining small molecules or large biotherapeutics, there is a requirement to understand optimal instrument performance and novel chemistry consumables. Moving analyses onto a UHPLC (ultra-high performance liquid chromatography) platform allows analysts to make gains in resolution and throughput. Coupling this with the best chemistry enables you to make scientific breakthroughs of grand importance.
Dr. James Grinias of Rowan University Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry will present the use of superficially porous particle (SPP) columns on an optimized UHPLC system. His workflow and system optimizations demonstrate how chromatographers can dramatically reduce run times, showing the separation of 24 neurotransmitters within 2.5 minutes. He will discuss how his work can be adapted for users looking to modernize pharmacopeial monograph methods.
Whitney Shatz, Principal Scientist, Genentech Research and Development Group will discuss her work developing a Fab and PEG conjugate for application in back of the eye diseases. Walking us through her work around combining the fragment antibody with PEG scaffolds of varying length and geometry, her use of novel chemistry consumables allowed her to select a lead candidate for the confirmation of half-life extension in a cyno pharmacokinetic model.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


Wed June 19
13.00 - 14.00

Hall U6 - 01B
ground floor

Laboratory water quality is more important than you may think! Practical tips about how to optimize your LC-MS results

Speaker: E. Riche (Milli-Q® Lab Water Solutions, France)

Ultrapure water is the most frequently used solvent in analytical laboratories. Since modern analytical techniques are increasingly sensitive, the impact of water quality on analytical results is becoming more important: the slightest water contamination may affect data quality, and potentially have an impact on the analytical instrument itself.
Water of sub-optimal quality for LC-MS may be due to an ineffective water purification process or improper water handling practices in the lab.
In this seminar, a number of easily avoidable ultrapure water handling pitfalls will be discussed. In particular, you will see concrete examples of how improper water storage, glassware cleaning, and laboratory environment may lead to ultrapure water quality degradation. We will offer practical advice on steps to take to ensure the water you use for LC-MS experiments is of the highest quality.
In addition, we will demystify water purification for you, and give you recommendations on how to select the optimal combination of purification technologies to obtain the optimal freshly produced ultrapure water for your specific needs.

Participants will be offered a great dedicated lunch by the Sponsor


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