00.00-00.00 PROVA
Hall U6 - 20 first floor Hall U6 - 23 first floor Hall U6 - 24 first floor Hall U6 - 25 first floor Hall U6 - 21 first floor Hall U6 - 26 first floor Hall U6 - 27 first floor Hall U6 - 28 first floor
08.30-09.30 Registration
09.30-11.00

09.30-11.00

Short course 1

09.30-11.00

Short course 2

09.30-11.00

Short course 3

09.30-11.00

Short course 4

09.30-11.00

Short course 5

09.30-11.00

Short course 6

09.30-11.00

Short course 7

09.30-11.00

Short course 8

11.00-11.30 Coffee break
11.30-13.00

11.30-13.00

Short course 9

11.30-13.00

Short course 10

11.30-13.00

Short course 11

11.30-13.00

Short course 12

11.30-13.00

Short course 13

11.30-13.00

Short course 14

11.30-13.00

Short course 15

11.30-13.00

Short course 16

   
16.00-19.00

Milan Conservatorio "Giuseppe Verdi"

16.00-19.00 Opening Ceremony

16.00-16.30 Welcome - Chairs of HPLC 2019 Italy

16.30-17.30 Award Presentation

17.30-18.30 "Music for Leonardo" M. Kemp, Oxford University, UK
and young musicians of the "Conservatorio della Musica Giuseppe Verdi di Milano"
directed by maestri M. Baggio and S. Mormone

18.30-19.00 "The art of chromatography" Attila Felinger, University of Pécs, Hungary

19.00-21.00 Welcome Reception
  • Hall U6 - 20 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 1

     

    Short course 1

    Introduction of GLP regulations and bioanalytical method validation by LC-MS

    Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a set of regulations intended to assure the quality and integrity of non-clinical laboratory studies that are intended to support research or marketing permits for products regulated by government agencies. The term GLP is most commonly associated with the pharmaceutical industry and the required non-clinical animal testing that must be performed prior to approval of new drug products.

    "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" published in May 2018 provides general recommendations for bioanalytical method validation using advanced technologies. This short course will focus on GLP regulations and the bioanalytical method validation for drugs and metabolites in biological matrices using LC-MS. It will help audiences to comply with the regulations for drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical industry and CROs. The course will also reflect the recently published white papers with regard to bioanalytical method validation using LC-MS.

    This course will benefit the analytical chemists, lab supervisors, QA/QC managers, GLP auditors and CRO consultants who work in the GLP-regulated labs and the pharmaceutical industry. This course will also benefit all levels of management as a refresher course to stay current with the GLP regulations.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 9

     

    Short course 9

    Drug quality fundamentals: quality control of small molecule drugs

    Speaker: Michael Dong
    MWD Consulting, Norwalk, Connecticut, USA

    Biography

    This introductory short course provides an overview of key drug quality concepts, standards, regulations, and practices in non-clinical development and manufacturing for the pharmaceutical industries. You will learn the roles of quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and the chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) drug development process in ensuring the safety, efficacy, and quality of drug products. It covers industry-standard processes such as SOPs, system and method qualification/validation, release testing, specifications, and certificates of analysis (COA). Specific quality attributes and analytical methodologies for drug substances and products in addition to the role of regulatory agencies are described.

    1. Introduction to Drug Quality and CMC quality assurance process
      • What is drug quality? Common quality issues of drug products
      • Important quality attributes: Appearance, form, identity, potency, purity, chirality, uniformity, bioavailability, stability, microbial activity, and sterility.
      • The CMC (Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control) Process in new drug development
      • GLP, GMP, GCP, ICH guidelines and other public standards
      • Regulatory oversight, registrations (IND, NDA, CTA), internal quality systems and processes, QC / QA unit, specifications, Critical Quality Attributes (CQA).
    2. QC of Small Molecule drug substance and product: specifications, release testing, COA, impurities, and stability
      • A case study of a small molecule drug: specifications, release testing, and COA
      • API: physical, appearance, solid state properties, form, chemical (id, MW, structure, purity, chiral purity, potency), moisture, heavy metals, ROI, residual solvents, solubility.
      • Drug products: physical, chemical, performance (dissolution), uniformity, microbial testing.
      • Stability protocols and shelf life determination.
  • Hall U6 - 23 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 2

     

    Short course 2

    Green sample preparation for new generation of analytical chemists: new concepts and fundamentals

    Speaker: Janusz Pawliszyn
    University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada

    Biography

    In this course several microextraction technologies will be discussed, namely solid phase microextraction (SPME), thin film microextraction (TFME) and needle trap devices (NT). The fundamental principles of these techniques, different calibration methods, coupling strategies to GC, LC, and MS and advantages and disadvantages of each microextraction approach will be covered. In addition, during this short course, recent advances, developments and applications of each technique in fields such as forensic, environmental, food and flavor, and clinical analysis will be described including high-throughput formats compatible with LC and direct coupling to MS for screening applications. Participants interested in clinical and medical applications should consider to take course "BioSPME in clinical, pharmaceutical and biotechnological research" offered in the afternoon.

    The course is targeted at HPLC 2019 participants, who wish to gain a deeper insight into the green sample preparation technologies:

    • PhD students
    • Analytical chemists
    • Scientists interested in on-site screening
    • Laboratory supervisors
    • Scientists and industry regulators
    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 10

     

    Short course 10

    BioSPME in clinical, pharmaceutical and biotechnological research

    Speaker: Barbara Bojko
    Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland

    Biography

    In the course participants will learn about applications of solid phase microextraction to medical research, clinical practice and drug discovery and development. The high throughput and automation for in vitro and ex vivo study of large as well as small sample volumes i.e. spot sampling, cell line study will be discussed. The course will underline how users can benefit from certain features of various device geometries, shapes, sizes and coatings when developing methods for different applications. Low invasive in vivo and in situ organ sampling in animals and in humans in the view of pharmacokinetics, therapeutic drug monitoring and biomarkers discovery will be explained on several examples. Practical approaches to quantitation with the use of kinetic and equilibrium-based calibration will be clarified. Also, recent advances in untargeted metabolomics and lipidomics will be shown with particular focus on applications to oncology, neuroscience and transplantology. The participants not familiar with SPME technology should consider to register also at course "Green sample preparation for new generation of analytical chemists: new concepts and fundamentals " offered in the morning.

    The course is targeted at both future and current SPME users, who wish to gain a deeper insight into the technology utilized in bioanalysis and thus improve data quality and increase their productivity.

    • PhD students
    • Analytical chemists
    • Biologists, clinicians and bioanalytical scientists
    • Laboratory supervisors
    • Scientists and industry regulators
  • Hall U6 - 24 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 3

     

    Short course 3

    Enantioselective "chiral" chromatography: from methodological concepts to real world applications

    Speaker: Wolfgang Lindner
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

    Biography

    Speaker: Michael Lämmerhofer
    University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany

    Biography

    The aim of this Short Course is to discuss first the background and the general concepts of separating enantiomers via liquid chromatography with focus on the direct enantiomer separation technology. The basic principle relies on the formation of diastereomeric intermediate associates between a chiral selector-moiety (the SO) and the enantiomeric analytes, the selectands (R)- and (S)-SAs. Conceptually the chemically very diversified chiral selector units get either strongly adsorbed or chemically immobilized onto the surface of a support material, most of the time silica-based particles with a controlled porosity. Such a material represents the chiral stationary phase (CSP) which gets then packed into columns leading to the so-called "chiral" columns.
    The formerly written diastereomeric [SO-(R)-SA] and [SO-(S)-SA] associates are physico-chemically different from each other in contrast to the non-associated (R)-SA and (S)-SA enantiomers. The binding strength of these two associates can be described by ΔG(R) and ΔG(S) values which are affected not only by the molecular structure and the steric motifs of the SO and of the SA moieties but also of the type of solvents and additives representing the mobile phase (MP) of the chromatographic system. In reality one can use normal phase (NP) polar organic (PO) or reversed phase (RP) conditions. In addition also SFC type MP compositions can be well applied. With other words, these chromatographic systems represent a "Troika" which needs to be considered when discussing the overall retention and enantioselectivity criteria. Essential are the multiple intramolecular interactions defined by the interaction sites of the SO and the SAs moieties together with their spatial arrangement. They represent the molecular recognition principles. The differences of the ΔG( R) and ΔG(S) values described by the ΔΔG values of the diastereomeric associates are directly related to the observed stereoselectivity values alpha (a) of the enantioselective (the "chiral") chromatographic system.

    In consideration of these basic principles we will then discuss the pros and cons of the most popular and promising so-called "chiral" columns operated in various MP modes. To date there is a wide selection of CSPs and "chiral" columns ranging from quite broadly applicable but also to very dedicated ones. It encompasses columns packed with ultra-high efficient CSPs enabling ultra-fast enantiomer separation but also CSPs and column formats useful for preparative enantiomer separation.
    Via the presentation of real world examples and applications we aim to give an overview of the state-of-the-art of this technology and to stress also specific challenges depending on the analytical questions.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 11

     

    Short course 11

    Advanced CE-MS approaches for metabolomics

    Speaker: Rawi Ramautar
    Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands

    Biography

    In the field of metabolomics, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) has become a very useful analytical technique for the profiling of highly polar and charged metabolites in biological samples. In this course, a comprehensive overview of recent developments in CE-MS for metabolic profiling studies is provided. Topics that will be covered include CE separation modes, capillary coatings and recent interfacing designs for hyphenating CE to MS. In this context, special attention will be devoted to interfacing techniques allowing in-depth metabolic profiling studies by CE-MS. Throughout the discussion attention will be paid to practical aspects used for CE-MS-based metabolomics. The potential of this analytical technique for large-scale and quantitative clinical metabolomics studies is also addressed. Finally, the utility of CE-MS for metabolomics is demonstrated for selected clinical and biological problems, especially for volume-limited samples. Conclusions and perspectives on this unique analytical strategy are presented.

  • Hall U6 - 25 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 4

     

    Short course 4

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) fundamentals

    Speaker: Caroline West
    University of Orleans, Orleans, France

    Biography

    This introductory course covers the basic elements of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The basic theory of SFC and currently available commercial instrumentation is presented. The effects of operating parameters (choice of stationary phases and mobile phase composition, temperature, pressure) and specific aspects of detection (UV, ELSD, MS) are explained in the perspective of method development. In addition, varied applications are discussed (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food science, environment ...).

    Who Should Attend
    Everyone interested in using Supercritical Fluid Chromatography as an alternative for their current analysis, or those that are already using SFC, but want a better understanding of the underlying principles of separation performance, retention and selectivity.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 12

     

    Short course 12

    Fundamentals of SFC to guide practical method-development

    Speaker: Abhijit Tarafder
    Waters Corporation, Milford, Massachusetts, USA

    Biography

    Modern Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (SFC) is mostly operated like HPLC. The only exception is that the former employs compressed CO2 as the principal solvent of the mobile-phase. The main physical difference between HPLC mobile-phases and SFC is the compressibility. SFC mobile-phases are significantly more compressible even when high composition of liquid organic solvent is added to CO2. E.g. isothermal compressibility of 80/20 (mass/mass,%) CO2/methanol mixture is 3.27 x 10-4 bar-1 at 20 ºC and 100 bar. In comparison compressibility of pure methanol is 1.08 x 10-4 bar-1, i.e. 3 times lesser under the same conditions (data from ref [1]). At higher temperatures, this difference is even starker.

    Method-development using a highly compressible mobile-phase can be confusing without a clearer insight on how compressibility vary with temperature and pressure and how such variations affect chromatographic behavior. Compressibility can also lead to unexpected consequences. E.g. in SFC any change in experimental methods and conditions that result into a change in system pressure, may affect chromatography. Change in particle size, column dimension or flow-rate, which do not affect analyte retention factor in HPLC, may do so in SFC. Another area of interest is in understanding the effect of pressure-drop on mobile-phase temperature variation. In ultra-performance LC, mobile-phase generally heats up caused by high pressure-drop. In SFC, although the pressure-drop is not significant, it can impart important temperature variations. Traditional belief is that compressible mobile-phase in SFC expands and cools under pressure-drop. In reality, mobile-phase in modern SFC can either cool, or heat-up like in LC, or may go through minimal temperature changes even with high pressure drop.

    It is not easy to describe in words how and under what conditions the effect of compressibility will affect chromatography; or when, because of a pressure-drop in mobile-phase, temperature will decrease or increase or not change. We need thermodynamic plots for better understanding of the situation. The objective of this course is to explain these topics with the help of two different thermodynamic plots - the isopycnic and the isenthalpic plots [2-3]. Isopycnic plots present constant density curves inside a pressure-temperature plane, whereas isenthalpic plots present constant enthalpy. First, construction of such plots will be described in details. Then, with the help of these plots, the convoluted nature of the physical properties of CO2-based mobile-phases, and their effect on chromatographic behavior in highly compressible regions will be explained.

    References

    • [1] E.W. Lemmon, M. Huber, M.O. McLinden, D.G. Friend, Standard Reference Data Program, Gaithersburg 9.0, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 2007.
    • [2] A. Tarafder, G. Guiochon, Journal of Chromatography A, 1218 (2011) 4576-4585.
    • [3] A. Tarafder, P. Iraneta, G. Guiochon, K. Kaczmarski, D. P. Poe, Journal of Chromatography A, 1366 (2014) 126-135
  • Hall U6 - 21 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 5

     

    Short course 5

    New trends in LC-MS

    Speaker: Achille Cappiello
    University of Urbino, Urbino, Italy

    Biography

    This course is recommended to a wide audience of intermediate-level scientists, students and technicians in the field of analytical chemistry and related disciplines, such as biology, environment, clinical and food, among others. It will be also an extremely useful course for newcomers in the field willing to approach this subject for the first time. No previous knowledge of mass spectrometry is necessary, but an understanding of the fundamentals of liquid chromatography is beneficial. The focus has been addressed to the new trends, starting from the innovations of each technique (what is the vanguard in liquid chromatography; what is the new frontier in mass spectrometry) to the most progressive challenges of LC-MS. Researchers, practitioners, consultants working in any field in which LC-MS is the technique of choice will find this course valuable, with complete, up-to-date information on this fascinating and powerful technique. They will learn the state-of-the-art for the currently available LC-MS interfaces, their operational principles, as well as the 'new frontiers' and their application potential. A special focus has been given to 'high-end' topics such as high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, single ion monitoring, multiple reaction monitoring, as well as to data processing to achieve the highest sensitivity and selectivity.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 13

     

    Short course 13

    Analytical characterization of protein biopharmaceuticals

    Speaker: Davy Guillarme
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

    Biography

    The characterization of therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represents a tremendous challenge. This short course will highlight the possibilities offered by all the different modes of chromatography (i.e. RPLC, SEC, IEX, HIC, HILIC) to rapidly and accurately characterize protein biopharmaceuticals (e.g., glycosylation, oxidation, deamidation, aggregation, glycation, lysine truncation...). The hyphenation of chromatographic approaches with mass spectrometry as well as the use of 2D-LC approaches will also be covered during the short course. Last but not least, the different levels of analysis of biopharmaceuticals will be discussed, including bottom-up analysis (2-5kDa), middle-up (25-100 kDa), and intact proteins analysis (150 kDa).

  • Hall U6 - 26 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 6

     

    Short course 6

    3D-printing in separation science

    Speaker: Simone Dimartino
    The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

    Biography

    This short course aims to offer an overview of how 3D printing is impacting the separation sciences in general, and chromatography in particular. 3D printing can seamlessly create bespoke models with complex shapes, using a range of materials, and with resolutions that can reach the submicron-scale. This capability opened a new way to fabricate stationary phases, column housings, filtration elements, extraction units and other devices of relevance to the separation science.

    This short course will open with a short introduction on 3D printing and the main printing techniques of relevance to us. Then, a selection of original research pieces will be presented, demonstrating how separation science is benefitting from 3D printers. Finally, current challenges as well as future opportunities will be discussed. This course should spur additional interest in the area and promote new ideas on how to employ 3D printers in our research.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 14

     

    Short course 14

    Rediscovering HPTLC and its hyphenations: with minimalism to maximal information on product quality and safety

    Speaker: Gertrud Morlock
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany

    Biography

    Strong features of high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) are illustrated by examples. It is discussed how it can be exploited for the sake of your analytical task. An overview is given on the state-of-the-art HPTLC and its diverse couplings to mass spectrometry. Desorption- and elution-based couplings and their latest automations are discussed.
    Modern direct bioautography is focussed, as it is the most straightforward technique of effect-directed analysis. Latest novel workflows for biological and enzymatic assays led to sharply bounded active zones on a homogeneous background, and thus opened up new avenues. Reliable and meaningful autograms evaluated by densitometric measurements paved the way for quantitative direct bioautography. The trick of inverse scanning is needed to measure zones absorbing less than the background. Besides calibration via external standards, equivalency calculation with reference to a well-known active compound can be an alternative, if the active analyte is not identified or known. Just applied versus developed positive control levels are compared for equivalency calculation. The selection of a positive and negative control to be applied on each plate is explained. System blanks need to be performed for each sample set, too. Piezoelectric spraying, a new mode for covering the chromatogram with the assay, is compared with automated immersion.
    Latest trends in open source-based data evaluation and miniaturized planar chromato-graphy are illustrated that aim at an open source system which combines all steps of planar chromatograpy (all-in-one) in an online (fully automated) operation mode.

  • Hall U6 - 27 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 7

     

    Short course 7

    Preparative chromatography

    Speaker: Attila Felinger
    University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary

    Biography

    Large-scale separations have been intensively used in various fields such as pharmaceutical industry or biotechnology for the purification of target compounds. The aim of the short course is to provide separation scientists with a deeper understanding of the industrial scale separation process, with emphasis on the scale-up and optimization of large-scale process chromatography.
    The presentation will summarize the fundamentals and practice concerning the selection of the operational conditions of preparative chromatography by starting with an introduction to nonlinear chromatography. The consequences of column overloading, nonlinear isotherms and their general effects on the band profiles due to competition are discussed. The goals and target parameters of preparative separations, such as production rate, purity, yield, throughput, and purification costs, will be discussed.
    Various strategies to optimize preparative separations are overviewed. The advantages of the different objectives that consider the production rate, recovery yield or solvent consumption to achieve both productive and economical separations are discussed. Guidelines are given how to select the essential column design and experimental parameters to be optimized. The performance of isocratic, gradient elution, and displacement modes of chromatography as well as simulated moving bed separations are compared.
    The advantages of the modeling of the separation processes are demonstrated. Modeling will help save time and money when one tries to understand or optimize preparative separations.

    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 15

     

    Short course 15

    Preparative protein chromatography

    Speaker: Giorgio Carta
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA

    Biography

    This short course examines some of the fundamental underpinnings of protein chromatography and provides tools needed to understand and model preparative/process scale applications. The workshop will highlight differences between preparative protein chromatography and HPLC of small molecules. Mass transfer critically affects the former while packing quality is critically important for the latter. Column design and scale-up criteria are, thus, different in the two fields and will be emphasized in this presentation.

    • Protein adsorption isotherms
    • Protein mass transfer kinetics in chromatography particles
    • Characterization of protein chromatography columns according to the plate model
    • Gradient elution chromatography
    • Frontal loading and dynamic binding capacity
    • Scale-up of protein chromatography columns
  • Hall U6 - 28 first floor
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    09.30-11.00

    Short course 8

     

    Short course 8

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC): a tutorial focusing on best practices

    Speaker: Dwight Stoll
    Gustavus Adolphus College College, St. Peter, Minnesota, USA

    Biography

    Speaker: Matthias Pursch
    Dow Deutschland Anlagen GmbH, Stade, Germany

    Biography

    Speaker: Stephan Buckenmaier
    Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany

    Biography

    Abstract: Two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) can resolve difficult separation problems and has become important in industry for solving problems ranging from targeted analyses of structurally similar molecules to untargeted separations of highly complex samples. In 2D-LC, the effluent from a first dimension (1D) column is transferred to a second dimension (2D) column with the goal to resolve those analytes that co-eluted in 1D. In this tutorial we will discuss:

    • Concepts of targeted and comprehensive modes including a brief on the early history along with the theoretical underpinnings of the perceived advantages of 2D separations over their conventional 1D-LC counterparts.
    • Practical aspects of modern 2D-LC that are critical for the development of successful separations including experimental details, column selection, and the management of the interface between the two separation dimensions.
    • How to tackle analytical challenges that can make the difference between unimpressive and spectacular 2D-LC separations.
    • Recent applications of 2D-LC described in the literature that address problems in a variety of industries ranging from the analysis of small molecular weight compounds in polymers and biological materials to the analysis of food and (bio-) pharmaceuticals.
    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    11.30-13.00

    Short course 16

     

    Short course 16

    Statistical analysis of chromatographic data: a practical guide

    Speaker: Gabriel Vivó Truyols
    Tecnometrix, Spain

    Biography

    These days, the enormous quantity of data generated by HPLC instruments demand a background knowledge on data analysis. This is especially necessary when high-data density detectors are used (e.g. high-resolution mass spectrometry). In order to gain most of the advantages of the powerful instrumentation, the data generated has to be properly explored and analysed. These days, the quality of the results depends critically on how the data analysis task has been performed. This course is directed to a wide audience of HPLC practitioners that are interested in improving their skills in data analysis. We will introduce the audience to basic concepts in HPLC optimization, as well as in pre-processing (e.g. alignment, peak detection), curve resolution and multivariate pattern recognition and modelling. Special emphasis will be given to the state-of-the-art techniques in data analysis for HPLC-MS, including peak resolution, screening and library search. We will discuss applications in a diversity of industries, including food, forensics, pharma, Oil & gas, and omics.

  • Milan Conservatorio
    "Giuseppe Verdi"
    08.30-09.30 Registration
    11.00-11.30 Coffee break
    16.00-19.00

    Milan Conservatorio "Giuseppe Verdi"

    16.00-19.00 Opening Ceremony

    16.00-16.30 Welcome - Chairs of HPLC 2019 Italy

    16.30-17.30 Award Presentation

    17.30-18.30 "Music for Leonardo" M. Kemp, Oxford University, UK
    and young musicians of the "Conservatorio della Musica Giuseppe Verdi di Milano"
    directed by maestri M. Baggio and S. Mormone

    18.30-19.00 "The art of chromatography" Attila Felinger, University of Pécs, Hungary

     

    Plenary

    Opening ceremony - Milan Conservatorio "Giuseppe Verdi"

    16.00 - 16.30 Welcome
    A. Cavazzini, University of Ferrara, Italy
    M. Morbidelli, ETH Zurich - Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, Switzerland
    16.30 - 17.30 Award Presentation
    • Georges Giuochon Faculty Fellowship
    • Uwe D. Neue in Separation Science
    • Chromatographic Society Martin Medal
    • JFK Huber Lecture
    • Chromatographic Society Jubilee Medal
    17.30 - 18.30 Music for Leonardo
    M. Kemp, Oxford University, UK and young musicians of the "Conservatorio della Musica Giuseppe Verdi di Milano" directed by maestri M. Baggio and S. Mormone
    18.30 - 19.00 The art of chromatography
    A. Felinger, University of Pécs, Hungary
    19.00-21.00

    Welcome reception

     

     
Hall U6 - 06 ground floor Hall U6 - 07 ground floor Hall U6 - 08 ground floor Hall U6 - 09 ground floor Hall U6 - 01F ground floor Hall U6 - 01A ground floor
08.30-10.15 Registration
10.15-11.55

10.15-11.55

(MON 1.1)

Proteomics - 1

10.15-11.55

(MON 2.1)

Miniaturization & electrodriven technologies

10.15-11.55

(MON 3.1)

Fundamentals - 1, Column efficiency

10.15-11.55

(MON 4.1)

Food analysis - 1

   
12.20-14.00  

12.20-13.20

Vendor seminar
Merck

 

12.20-13.20

Vendor seminar
Agilent Technologies

12.20-13.20

Vendor seminar
Phenomenex

12.20-13.20

Vendor seminar
Waters Corporation

Lunch, Exhibition & Poster Session
14.00-15.35

14.00-15.35

(MON 1.2)

Sample preparation - 1

14.00-15.35

(MON 2.2)

Ion exchange chromatography & MS

14.00-15.35

(MON 3.2)

Fundamentals - 2, stationary phases

14.00-15.35

(MON 4.2)

Miniaturization & microfluidics

   
15.35-17.00 Coffee break, Exhibition & Poster Session
17.00-18.35

17.00-18.35

(MON 1.3)

Sample preparation - 2

17.00-18.35

(MON 2.3)

Biomedical applications

17.00-18.35

(MON 3.3)

Fundamentals - 3, stationary phases

17.00-18.35

(MON 4.3)

Innovative applications - 1

   
Hall U6 - 06 ground floor Hall U6 - 07 ground floor Hall U6 - 08 ground floor Hall U6 - 09 ground floor Hall U6 - 01F ground floor Hall U6 - 01A ground floor
08.30-10.10

08.30-10.10

(TUE 1.1)

LC-MS bioactive molecules - 1

08.30-10.10

(TUE 2.1)

Multidimensional chromatography - 1

08.30-10.10

(TUE 3.1)

Chiral separations - 1

08.30-10.10

(TUE 4.1)

Envinromental analysis

   
10.10-11.10 Coffee break, Exhibition & Poster Session
11.10-12.30

11.10-12.30

(TUE 1.2)

LC-MS bioactive molecules - 2

11.10-12.30

(TUE 2.2)

Multidimensional chromatography - 2

11.10-12.30

(TUE 3.2)

Chiral separations - 2

11.10-12.30

(TUE 4.2)

Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals - 1

   
12.30-14.00 Lunch, Exhibition & Poster Session
 

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Shimadzu Europa GmbH

 

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Agilent Technologies

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Molnár-Institute for Applied Chromatography

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Thermo Fisher Scientific

14.00-15.45

14.00-15.45

(TUE 1.3)

Biosample preparation

14.00-15.45

(TUE 2.3)

Omics - 1

14.00-15.45

(TUE 3.3)

Fundamentals - 4, retention & selectivity

14.00-15.45

(TUE 4.3)

Capillary electrophoresis - 1

   
15.45-16.35 Coffee break & Exhibition
16.35-18.00

16.35-18.00

(TUE 1.4)

Proteomics - 2

16.35-18.00

(TUE 2.4)

Glycomics & protein interactions

16.35-18.00

(TUE 3.4)

Data Analysis - 1

16.35-18.00

(TUE 4.4)

SFC-MS

   
18.00-19.00    

18.00-19.00

Separation Science Slam

     
19.00-19.30    

19.00-19.30

Separation Science Slam Apero

     
Hall U6 - 06 ground floor Hall U6 - 07 ground floor Hall U6 - 08 ground floor Hall U6 - 09 ground floor Hall U6 - 01F ground floor Hall U6 - 01A ground floor Hall U6 - 01B ground floor
08.30-10.20

08.30-10.20

(WED 1.1)

Forensic, doping and toxicology

08.30-10.20

(WED 2.1)

Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals - 2

08.30-10.20

(WED 3.1)

HILIC

08.30-10.20

(WED 4.1)

Instrumentation & quantitation

     
10.20-11.20 Coffee break, Exhibition & Poster Session
11.20-12.40

11.20-12.40

(WED 1.2)

Lipidomics

11.20-12.40

(WED 2.2)

3D printing

11.20-12.40

(WED 3.2)

SFC - 1

11.20-12.40

(WED 4.2)

Food analysis - 2

     
12.40-14.00 Lunch, Exhibition & Poster Session

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Waters Corporation

     

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Agilent Technologies

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Thermo Fisher Scientific

13.00-14.00

Vendor seminar
Merck

14.00-15.45

14.00-15.45

(WED 1.3)

Omics - 2

14.00-15.45

(WED 2.3)

Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals - 3

14.00-15.45

(WED 3.3)

Fundamentals-5 Temperature responsive LC and selectivity

14.00-15.45

(WED 4.3)

Multidimensional chromatography - 3

     
15.45-16.35 Coffee break & Exhibition
16.35-18.00

16.35-18.00

(WED 1.4)

Omics - 3

16.35-18.00

(WED 2.4)

Miniaturization & LC-MS interface

16.35-18.00

(WED 3.4)

Quality control - 1

16.35-18.00

(WED 4.4)

Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals - 4

     
18.00-19.00    

18.00-19.00

HPLC Tube

       
19.00-19.30    

19.00-19.30

HPLC Tube Apero

       
20.30-24.00

Gala Dinner

Hall U6 - 06 ground floor Hall U6 - 07 ground floor Hall U6 - 08 ground floor Hall U6 - 09 ground floor
08.30-10.05

08.30-10.05

(THU 1.1)

Capillary electrophoresis - 2

08.30-10.05

(THU 2.1)

Preparative chromatography - 1

08.30-10.05

(THU 3.1)

HPTLC - 1

08.30-10.05

(THU 4.1)

SFC - 2 & data analysis - 2

10.05-11.10 Coffee break, Exhibition & Poster Session
11.10-12.55

11.10-12.55

(THU 1.2)

Quality control - 2

11.10-12.55

(THU 2.2)

Preparative chromatography - 2

11.10-12.55

(THU 3.2)

HPTLC - 2

11.10-12.55

(THU 4.2)

Innovative applications - 2

12.55-14.00 Lunch & Exhibition
14:30 - 16:15

Aula Magna

14.00 - 16.15 Closing Plenary Session

14.00 - 14.30 "Microscale Liquid Phase Separations Using Specific Interactions" K. Otsuka, Kyoto University, Japan

14.30 - 15.00 "Polymer brush bonded phases for MS-compatible mobile phases in protein separations" M. Wirth, Purdue University, USA

15.00 - 15.30 "Lipidomics: A window of opportunity for clinical analysis" Micheal Lämmerhofer, University of Tüebingen, Germany

15.30 - 15.45 Invitation from three future chairmen (HPLC2019 Kyoto, HPLC2020 San Diego, HPLC2021 Duesseldorf)

15.45 - 16.15 Closing ceremony (Csaba Horvath Young Scientist Award and Best Poster Award)

16.15-17.30 Farewell Drink

Plenary

Short course

Keynote and Oral communication

Vendor seminar

Special event

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